Caregiver Tips and Tools

Provide better care for your aging loved one

Caregiving Guide

Having a relative who requires caregiving can become a full-time job. Your aging parent may need assistance completing everyday tasks, going to medical appointments, getting medication, and you can quickly become overwhelmed with a great deal of responsibility.

Knowing what kind of skills and resources you need to support your relative is an important step in providing them the care they need.

Here is a detailed guide on how to become a family caregiver.

Community Resources

It is very important to know what community resources are available to you if your loved one has been diagnosed with an illness. Identifying and understanding their needs will enable you to better care for them. Having a family discussion to get everyone’s input is a good starting point. Together, you can access and benefit from community resources available in Palm beach County to provide better home care.

Learn more with the Community Resources guide.

Balancing Life, Work, and Elder Care

With the aging of the baby boomer generation, the proportion of elder adults to working adults has greatly increased, making it much more difficult for families to take proper care of their parents. Many individuals have great difficulty in maintaining a career, their own lives, and taking care of their parents. Luckily, there are resources available to help you find relief.

Read the Balancing Life and Caregiving guide for more information.

The Emotional Side of Caregiving

Having a relative who requires caregiving can become a full-time job. Your aging parent may need assistance completing everyday tasks, going to medical appointments, getting medication, and you can quickly become overwhelmed with a great deal of responsibility.

Knowing what kind of skills and resources you need to support your relative is an important step in providing them the care they need.

Here is a detailed guide on how to become a family caregiver.

When Your Loved One Refuses Home Care

There are many reasons why someone may be resistant to accepting home care, such as pride, feeling their privacy is at stake, finances, or that they’re losing control of their life. This can make a transition especially difficult for you if you believe your loved one is in need of home care.

In-home care is often a necessity, and here are some tips for getting your loved one on board.

Driving with Dementia

While your loved one may not be unable to drive due to their dementia, there comes a point where they should refrain from doing so for their safety and the safety of others. Determining when your loved one should give up driving isn’t an easy task, considering if affects people in different ways and at different rates.

As dementia worsens over time, and individual’s capacity to perform everyday tasks can be severely diminished. For the same reasons your loved one may be resistant to accepting in-home care they may be reluctant to give up the wheel. Some won’t be convinced that they shouldn’t drive, while others may recognize that it’s dangerous. In the former case, it is the responsibility of family and caregivers to decide when to intervene before an accident occurs.

Here are some Driving Safety Tips.